Fréquence Juive Magazine

"Sephardic Spice Girls" For our grandmothers, Purim did not mean matching Mishloach Manot to the theme of the family Purim costumes. Or a basket filled with Israeli wafers, chocolates and candy, mini bottles of grape juice and the ubiquitous grogger all wrapped in cellophane tied with a big plastic bow. For our grandmothers, Purim meant baking recipes handed down through the generations. "Sephardic Spice Girls" For our grandmothers, Purim did not mean matching Mishloach Manot to the theme of the family Purim costumes. Or a basket filled with Israeli wafers, chocolates and candy, mini bottles of grape juice and the ubiquitous grogger all wrapped in cellophane tied with a big plastic bow. For our grandmothers, Purim meant baking recipes handed down through the generations.


Traditions and Customs



The Rabbinic dictum to give gifts of food (Mishloach Manot) to friends and family, meant that across the Middle East and Mediterranean, our grandmothers would spend days baking sweet and savory delicacies.
Purim celebrates the tale of the Persian king, Achashverosh, and his wicked adviser Haman who plotted to kill the Jews, only to be foiled by the beautiful Esther and wise Mordechai.
What better way to honor the joy of the holiday and remember that we were saved from the decree to kill all the Jews than to bake yummy treats that evoke the defeat of Haman.
Purim has a special resonance for Persian Jews, who bake a rose-water flavored cookie sprinkled with poppy seeds or sesame seeds to represent Haman’s fleas! They also make a flour based halvah that is flavored with cardamom, saffron & rosewater.

Traditions and Customs



The Rabbinic dictum to give gifts of food (Mishloach Manot) to friends and family, meant that across the Middle East and Mediterranean, our grandmothers would spend days baking sweet and savory delicacies.
Purim celebrates the tale of the Persian king, Achashverosh, and his wicked adviser Haman who plotted to kill the Jews, only to be foiled by the beautiful Esther and wise Mordechai.
What better way to honor the joy of the holiday and remember that we were saved from the decree to kill all the Jews than to bake yummy treats that evoke the defeat of Haman.
Purim has a special resonance for Persian Jews, who bake a rose-water flavored cookie sprinkled with poppy seeds or sesame seeds to represent Haman’s fleas! They also make a flour based halvah that is flavored with cardamom, saffron & rosewater.


The Bulgarian Jews serve a lemon vermicelli pasta dish to represent Haman’s hair.
The Rhodesli Jews have the Ladino tradition of baking biscocchos, burekas and "Fulares", a bread based roll holding a hard boiled egg with two criss-cross strips of dough over the egg representing either the caged Haman or the hanging of Haman.
The Jewish communities of North Africa make a sweet fried dough called "fijuelas" dipped in a honey syrup, and a special Purim bread roll, similar to the Fulares, with a whole egg cradled in the bread, called "Ojos de Haman", literally eyes of Haman, with two strips of dough on top forming an X. Rachel grew up eating these as a child in Casablanca. When her family moved to Los Angeles, Rachel's mother Rica worked full time and one Purim she forgot to make the bread. When she came home from work and was reminded it was Purim, she quickly pulled out some bagels, made a small amount of dough , boiled some eggs and placed them on top of the bagels and baked them (welcome to America!). Looking back over the years, there was never a Purim without these treats. Today Rachel keeps her mother's traditions alive by making them for her family and friends.
The Jews of Babylon baked many treats for Purim. Sharon’s grandmother was renowned for the deliciousness of her "ba’ba ta’mar", a savory crispy yeast cookie with a soft, creamy date filling. She would sit with her wooden rolling pin, surrounded by bowls of dough, date filling and a seemingly endless supply of sesame seeds. Other Iraqi treats included baklava, almond macaroons and "malfouf", rose water flavored almond cigars made from filo pastry. They also made "sambusak"—baked dough pockets filled with cheese and fried dough pockets filled with deliciously spiced chickpeas.

Rachel & Sharon BIO



Rachel Emquies Sheff was born in Casablanca to a Spanish Moroccan family that emigrated to Los Angeles when she was seven. She learned to cook from her mother. From precious pearls of couscous to spicy mouthfuls of Moroccan fish, from slow-cooked dafina to crispy, paper thin galettes, Rachel has mastered the art, spice and spirit of the Moroccan kitchen.

The Bulgarian Jews serve a lemon vermicelli pasta dish to represent Haman’s hair.
The Rhodesli Jews have the Ladino tradition of baking biscocchos, burekas and "Fulares", a bread based roll holding a hard boiled egg with two criss-cross strips of dough over the egg representing either the caged Haman or the hanging of Haman.
The Jewish communities of North Africa make a sweet fried dough called "fijuelas" dipped in a honey syrup, and a special Purim bread roll, similar to the Fulares, with a whole egg cradled in the bread, called "Ojos de Haman", literally eyes of Haman, with two strips of dough on top forming an X. Rachel grew up eating these as a child in Casablanca. When her family moved to Los Angeles, Rachel's mother Rica worked full time and one Purim she forgot to make the bread. When she came home from work and was reminded it was Purim, she quickly pulled out some bagels, made a small amount of dough , boiled some eggs and placed them on top of the bagels and baked them (welcome to America!). Looking back over the years, there was never a Purim without these treats. Today Rachel keeps her mother's traditions alive by making them for her family and friends.
The Jews of Babylon baked many treats for Purim. Sharon’s grandmother was renowned for the deliciousness of her "ba’ba ta’mar", a savory crispy yeast cookie with a soft, creamy date filling. She would sit with her wooden rolling pin, surrounded by bowls of dough, date filling and a seemingly endless supply of sesame seeds. Other Iraqi treats included baklava, almond macaroons and "malfouf", rose water flavored almond cigars made from filo pastry. They also made "sambusak"—baked dough pockets filled with cheese and fried dough pockets filled with deliciously spiced chickpeas.

Rachel & Sharon BIO



Rachel Emquies Sheff was born in Casablanca to a Spanish Moroccan family that emigrated to Los Angeles when she was seven. She learned to cook from her mother. From precious pearls of couscous to spicy mouthfuls of Moroccan fish, from slow-cooked dafina to crispy, paper thin galettes, Rachel has mastered the art, spice and spirit of the Moroccan kitchen.

Today Rachel keeps her mother's traditions alive by making them for her family and friends. Today Rachel keeps her mother's traditions alive by making them for her family and friends.





Sharon Gomperts was born in Tel Aviv to a family with roots in Baghdad and El Azair, Iraq. Her family emigrated to Sydney, Australia and then to Los Angeles. She learned to cook the classics of Iraqi Jewish food—T’bit, bamia, sabich—from her mother and grandmother.
Rachel and Sharon have been friends since high school. They have a passion for healthy cooking and sharing delicious food with family and friends.
Over the years, they have collaborated on events for the Sephardic Educational Center and community cooking classes.
Known as the Sephardic Spice Girls, they write the weekly food column for the Jewish Journal.
Follow them on Instagram @sephardicspicegirls and on Facebook at Sephardic Spice SEC Food.TikTok: Sephardicspicegirls

RECIPE : PURIM OJOS DE HAMAN



North African Purim bread

I make individual rolls, or you can make larger breads with two , or more eggs on top.
Boil your eggs, discard water and set aside to cool and dry

Dough : Mix the following ingredients and let sit 5-10min till frothy

_ 2 cups flour (all purpose, or bread flour)
_ ¾ cup sugar
_ 3 Tbsp yeast
_ 2 1/2 cup warm water

Once frothy, Add :

_ 1/2 cup oil
_ 1 Tbsp Salt
_ 2 tablespoons of anise seed, (fennel seeds)

Add Additional 5 cups flour, you can add more flour if too wet.
Mix everything together in Kitchen aid or by hand. Cover with plastic and a dish towel let rise for one hour.
Beat one egg and use it as glue for the strips of dough that will go on top of your eggs.
Punch down, divide dough and separate into equal balls the size of your palm. Take one of the balls and flatten, cut into strips of dough that will hold down your egg. Take a ball, pierce hole in the center with your fingers, as if you were making a donut, place an egg in the center and place it on a baking sheet, take two strips of dough and make an X on top of your egg.

Sharon Gomperts was born in Tel Aviv to a family with roots in Baghdad and El Azair, Iraq. Her family emigrated to Sydney, Australia and then to Los Angeles. She learned to cook the classics of Iraqi Jewish food—T’bit, bamia, sabich—from her mother and grandmother.
Rachel and Sharon have been friends since high school. They have a passion for healthy cooking and sharing delicious food with family and friends.
Over the years, they have collaborated on events for the Sephardic Educational Center and community cooking classes.
Known as the Sephardic Spice Girls, they write the weekly food column for the Jewish Journal.
Follow them on Instagram @sephardicspicegirls and on Facebook at Sephardic Spice SEC Food.TikTok: Sephardicspicegirls

RECIPE : PURIM OJOS DE HAMAN



North African Purim bread

I make individual rolls, or you can make larger breads with two , or more eggs on top.
Boil your eggs, discard water and set aside to cool and dry

Dough : Mix the following ingredients and let sit 5-10min till frothy

_ 2 cups flour (all purpose, or bread flour)
_ ¾ cup sugar
_ 3 Tbsp yeast
_ 2 1/2 cup warm water

Once frothy, Add :

_ 1/2 cup oil
_ 1 Tbsp Salt
_ 2 tablespoons of anise seed, (fennel seeds)

Add Additional 5 cups flour, you can add more flour if too wet.
Mix everything together in Kitchen aid or by hand. Cover with plastic and a dish towel let rise for one hour.
Beat one egg and use it as glue for the strips of dough that will go on top of your eggs.
Punch down, divide dough and separate into equal balls the size of your palm. Take one of the balls and flatten, cut into strips of dough that will hold down your egg. Take a ball, pierce hole in the center with your fingers, as if you were making a donut, place an egg in the center and place it on a baking sheet, take two strips of dough and make an X on top of your egg.

Use the beaten egg as glue to secure your strips. If they begin to slide, use toothpicks. With a knife or scissors cut around the edge of your bun on each side and pinch together to form a flower or sun. Brush the whole top with egg wash. To get a dark crust mix one egg with one yolk and a tablespoon of honey. Optional - you can sprinkle with sesame seeds, and bake at 350 degrees.
In some parts of North Africa, this bread is made with almonds and / or raisins mixed into the dough.
« Fulares » - Portuguese easter bread - are basically the same but much smaller, and some ladies like to use « Bureka » dough.
You can use your favorite challah dough and add anise and sesame seeds.
.
Use the beaten egg as glue to secure your strips. If they begin to slide, use toothpicks. With a knife or scissors cut around the edge of your bun on each side and pinch together to form a flower or sun. Brush the whole top with egg wash. To get a dark crust mix one egg with one yolk and a tablespoon of honey. Optional - you can sprinkle with sesame seeds, and bake at 350 degrees.
In some parts of North Africa, this bread is made with almonds and / or raisins mixed into the dough.
« Fulares » - Portuguese easter bread - are basically the same but much smaller, and some ladies like to use « Bureka » dough.
You can use your favorite challah dough and add anise and sesame seeds.
.

Courrier des lecteurs

Recettes et cuisine juive

Recettes et cuisine juive

Le Roule au Nutella de Pessah

Le roulé ou plutôt la bûche de Pessah ? Appelez ce dessert comme vous voulez ! Mais pensez à le cuisiner avant la fête. Avec le café ou en dessert, c'est l'incontournable de Pessah ! Notez bien la recette @HomeMadeWithLoveByC

Recettes et cuisine juive

Jarrets d'agneau aux fruits secs

Symbole du sacrifice pascal, l'agneau figure sur de nombreux menus du Seder. En marinant les jarrets d'agneau avec de l'ail et des épices et en les cuisant avec des fruits secs en un lent et long mijotage, on obtient un plat appétissant.

Recettes et cuisine juive

UN POURIM SEPHARADE

"Les filles sépharades épicées" Pour nos grands-mères, Pourim ne signifiait pas assortir les Mishloach Manot au thème des costumes de Pourim de la famille. Ou un panier rempli de gaufrettes, de chocolats et de bonbons israéliens, de mini bouteilles de jus de raisin et de l'omniprésent grogger, le tout emballé dans du cellophane avec un gros nœud en plastique. Pour nos grands-mères, Pourim signifiait des recettes de cuisine transmises de génération en génération.

Recettes et cuisine juive

Couscous tunisien "aux asperges"

Le couscous est un aliment de base dans la plupart des cuisines d'Afrique du Nord. Il est connu comme le plat national en Tunisie, en Algérie et au Maroc, ainsi qu'en Mauritanie et en Libye.
Pour les Juifs marocains et d'autres pays d'Afrique du Nord, le couscous aux sept légumes est un plat traditionnel de Rosh Hashanah. Les sept légumes symbolisent la chance pour la nouvelle année à venir et tous les grains de couscous représentent la nouvelle année riche d'innombrables bénédictions.
Le couscous est fabriqué à partir de petites boules de semoule de blé dur qui sont écrasées et traditionnellement cuites à la vapeur dans un cuiseur à couscous pour produire des grains plus gros et plus tendres.
Le couscous précuit, également connu sous le nom de couscous instantané, prend moins de temps à préparer que le couscous traditionnel, et est presque aussi bon.
Le couscous est également le nom de la recette réalisée avec la semoule du même nom. Il existe une multitude de recettes de couscous nord-africain, dont des variantes végétariennes, à la viande (bœuf, agneau, etc.), au poulet, au poisson, ou même au beurre (couscous au beurre).
La recette présentée ici est la version tunisienne. Le couscous tunisien est l'une des innombrables variantes de ce plat délicieux et polyvalent. Cependant, le couscous tunisien a quelques particularités qui le différencient du couscous algérien ou marocain. La sauce tunisienne pour le couscous est toujours rouge, grâce à la tomate.
@miriams__kitchen

Recettes et cuisine juive

Gâteau quatre-quarts aux bleuets et au citron

@thefashionbistro sur Instagram et Facebook
MADE IN LOS ANGELES WITH THE FRENCH'TOUCH

Recettes et cuisine juive

SOUCCOT Sous les roseaux du paradis

La « fête des cabanes », le retour aux sources, la vie à la Robinson, Loulav & Etrog, se détacher du matériel, apprécier les vraies valeurs et les choses simples, voilà ce qu’est Souccot. Dans la cabane, on y mange, dort et chante avec une grande simha. Kidouch mélodieux, (kémia oblige !), repas conviviaux, parties de belote, cours de Guemara, tout est fait pour que nous quittions nos habitudes. Embrassades amicales, « tape 5 » dans la main, rigolades, plaisanteries, bonne humeur… on ne veut plus que ça s’arrête ! Il y a comme un air de vacances qui nous fait suivre le rythme et la cadence animée de ces belles journées de fêtes. Chaque soir, on se couche épuisé mais le lendemain, on recommence. On doit se préparer pour aller à la synagogue en marchant… nous sommes des juifs errants, les mêmes que ceux qui ont marché 40 ans dans le désert, en contact direct avec la nature et avec Hachem.

Recettes et cuisine juive

YOM KIPPOUR Le pardon Divin

Le jour du Grand Pardon, Yom ha –Kippourim, est la plus grande fête célébrée par les juifs du monde entier. Solennelle, longue, dure mais si belle, si forte, cette fête qui nous rend purs, celle qui nous fait Anges, chaque année, nous l’attendons, nous la respectons, nous l’aimons.

Recettes et cuisine juive

LES MENUS DES FETES DE TICHRI
Les délices de Rosh Hachana

Comme chaque année, les fêtes approchent et vous vous souciez de la bonne organisation de vos repas. Gérer à la fois la rentrée des classes, les courses, les repas, le ménage et les autres évènements du quotidien n’est pas toujours chose facile. Mais si en plus, on vous dit que pendant près d’un mois, vous devrez cuisiner presque tous vos repas à l’avance - certes, avec des pauses entre chaque fête - et vous appliquer afin de rivaliser avec les meilleurs restaurants, alors là ! La barre est très haute ! Si vous lancez vos invitations à la dernière minute, et que la veille de Roch Hachana, vous ne savez toujours pas ce que vous allez servir pour les fêtes, il est certain que vous entamerez course téméraire contre la montre.
Cependant, concilier le tout, c’est possible. Trouvez votre motivation en contemplant ces étoiles qui brillent lorsque vous vous imaginez tous réunis à la même table pour célébrer une nouvelle année pleine de bonheur et de joie. Pour vous aider à préparer vos fêtes avec sérénité, Fréquence Juive a concocté pour vous, un vrai programme culinaire : des listes de courses, quelques menus et des recettes de cuisine, afin de vous donner des idées et, ainsi, vous soulager dans l’organisation de vos repas. Quels que soient vos origines, vos goûts ou vos envies, vous y trouverez toujours des plats intéressants . Du plus simple au plus délicat, ces mets délicieux n’attendent que votre batterie de cuisine pour être préparés.
Fréquence Juive vous suggère des idées de plats à cuisiner, accompagnées de quelques recettes.

Recettes et cuisine juive

Etes vous plutot boulou ou bouscoutou ?

Stars des tables judéo-tunisiennes ! Tartinés avec de la pâte de noisettes, servis avec un café turc ou une citronnade, cette génoise moelleuse et ce biscuit sec évoqueront toujours avec une grande nostalgie, ce goûter typique de l’enfance sépharade. Préparés par des marocains ou des tunisiens, chacun sa tradition ! Une chose est sûre, chez les plus grands comme les plus petits, sur une table de Shabbat ou dans un coin de la cuisine, le « boulou" et le « bouscoutou » font l’unanimité.

Recettes et cuisine juive

Le Cheesecake "gastronomique" de Chavouot

La voie lactée de Chavouot est notre fameux gâteau au fromage traditionnel aux mille recettes, voici une version savoureuse et délicate ! Testez, dégustez et n’hésitez pas à imaginer un nappage de fruits, de crème, de bonbons ... Hag Samea'h ! Recette de Laurence Orah Phitoussi @babaganoush_recipes sur Instagram.

Recettes et cuisine juive

Tiramisu sans Gluten

Recette d’Estie Wolbe publiée sur le site kosher.com

Recettes et cuisine juive

Biscotti aux pépites de chocolat et aux dattes

Recette de Jamie Feit Spécialiste et Coach en nutrition Casher & Gluten free

Recettes et cuisine juive

Les couronnes à l’anis

LES RECETTES DE NOTRE COMMUNAUTÉ Le Talmud dit qu’il n’existe pas de fête sans nourriture et sans boisson. Originaire d'Afrique du nord où les pâtisseries Juives ressemblent beaucoup aux pâtisseries Arabes., Cecile vous dévoile aujourd'hui, ses talents de pâtissière. Au menu : de simples biscuits en forme de couronne, au goût subtil et parfumé d'anis.

Recettes et cuisine juive

LES GALETTES BLANCHES DE POURIM VERSION 2021

Symbolisant l'innocence et la pureté de la reine Esther, ces petits biscuits secs recouverts d'un glaçage royal font la star des gâteaux de Pourim. Recette algéroise ou Constantinoise, le plus important, c' est de ne pas rater le blanc !

Recettes et cuisine juive

LE "CHOLENT" : On l'appelle aussi LA "DAF"

Plus connu sous le nom de ragoût ou « hamin » - chaud, en hébreu, ce plat ancien datant du 1er siècle est né de l’interdit de cuisiner pendant Shabbat. Fréquence Juive vous présente, aujourd’hui, une recette revisitée ne manquant pas d’originalité. Et oui ! Au delà de tous les clichés, les hommes cuisinent !

Recettes et cuisine juive

La côte de boeuf MADE IN L.A.

Plats copieux, salades de Shabbat, desserts gourmands, nous recherchons souvent « the » recette, le plat le plus original, celui qui nous fait saliver au resto !

Recettes et cuisine juive

PÂTES FRAÎCHES "AL DENTE", "FROM SCRATCH" & "HANDMADE"

"Al dente" signifie que les pâtes doivent être à peine croquantes. C'est ainsi que les mange les italiens ! Fondantes et moelleuses, NI besoin de machine perfectionnée ou de préparation longue, juste des produits frais et l'envie de partager un plat chaleureux entre amis ou en famille. Avis aux amateurs de bonnes pâtes !

Recettes et cuisine juive

LA COCA ALGÉROISE REVISITÉE PAR : LES NOUVELLES MERES JUIVES

Certains diront qu'il s'agit d'une pizza, d'autres d'un chausson... Pour les novices, ne vous imaginez pas une pizza italienne, ni un chausson aux pommes, vous ne pourriez pas être plus loin de la réalité. En effet, cette pâtisserie salée, que l'on retrouve dans toutes sortes de boulangeries algériennes qui se respectent, c'est une "Chakchouka" (une compotée de poivrons, tomates, oignons, toujours pour les non-initiés), enfermée dans une pâte. Elle peut prendre différentes formes, celle d'un grand rectangle à découper en parts, ou celle de petits chaussons fourrés.

Recettes et cuisine juive

Macarons aux écorces de chocolat Recette de Pessa'h

Avec les "Coconut Macaroons" Manischewitz , By NINA SAFAR @kosherinthekitch , From LOS ANGELES

Recettes et cuisine juive

Thor’Apéro : Fricassés au Thon LE GRAND CLASSIQUE BY SABINE

Qui n’a jamais « kiffé l’apéro » de Chabbat ? Plus connu sous le nom de « kémia », ce moment privilégié que l’on partage soit le vendredi soir, soit le samedi midi, entre amis, en famille, à la syna, dans le jardin d’un ami ou même sur le balcon des voisins, est un vrai « toast à la vie ». Très souvent entre le Kiddouch et quelques paroles de Thora, on commence par lever un verre (alcool à consommer avec modération évidemment) en s’exclamant « leh’aïm » ! (à la vie !).

SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER!
Subscribe now!